[ntp:questions] Re: New to NTPD

Ted Gervais ve1drg at av.eastlink.ca
Tue May 9 19:03:09 UTC 2006


Here is what ntpq -p shows at my place:

      remote           refid      st t when poll reach   delay   offset 
jitter
==============================================================================
*LOCAL(0)        73.78.73.84      5 l   63   64  377    0.000    0.000 
0.001
  time-b.nist.gov .RSTR.          16 u    -   64    0    0.000    0.000 
4000.00
  time-b.nist.gov .RSTR.          16 u    -   64    0    0.000    0.000 
4000.00
  time-A.timefreq .RSTR.          16 u    -   64    0    0.000    0.000 
4000.00
  time.nist.gov   .RSTR.          16 u    -   64    0    0.000    0.000 
4000.00

And this is after a whole day of operation...

Sure doesn't look like yours..


On Tue, 9 May 2006, Richard B. Gilbert wrote:

> Ted Gervais wrote:
>
>> Well I finally am moving away from netdate and have ntpd installed and 
>> running.
>> I brought it up using ntpd -g,  and hope that is ok.
>> 
>> Also I have no idea that it is doing anthing?   How do I know that it is 
>> running.
>> The drift file has only one entry in it, and that is all zeros..
>> 
>> Is there some way that I can watch what is happening like the way I watch 
>> log files using 'tail -f messages'  ??
>> 
>> I have all the logfile stuff turned on so I can read any and all stuff that 
>> is happening and  yet while that says a few things I at this point don't 
>> know that it is doing anything with the system time.
>> 
>> I am running linux (slackware 10.2)..
>> 
>> 
>> 
>
> ntpq -p
>
> It will show you a "billboard" listing, for each server:
> 1. whether it is selected  (*=selected, +=candidate, -not a candidate, X 
> insane.
> 2. the name or IP address
> 3. the reference ID
> 4. the stratum
> 5. the type
> 6. when it was last polled
> 7. the poll interval
> 8. reachability (eight bit shift register in octal. A 1 is shifted in from 
> the right for each response from the server and a 0 for each failure to 
> respond; 0 is bad 377 is good.
> 9. The round trip delay to and from that server, in milliseconds.
> 10. The offset of your clock from that server, in milliseconds
> 11. The jitter, a measure of the random noise in the time received; low 
> numbers are good.
>
> This display can look quite disappointing when you cold start ntpd. Ntpd may 
> need several hours to get your clock into really good synchroniation.
>
> Here's a sample:
>
> sunblok_$ ntpq -p
>     remote           refid      st t when poll reach   delay   offset 
> jitter
> ==============================================================================
> *GPS_ONCORE(0)   .GPS.            0 l    4   16  377    0.000    0.003  0.001
> sunburn         .WWV.            1 u  165 1024  377    0.450   42.953 
> 1.821
> +Internet-A      .PSC.            1 u   42   64  377   17.061    1.635  2.089
> -Internet-B      .CDMA.           1 u   41   64  377   19.267    4.958  1.368
> +Internet-C      18.145.0.30      2 u   12   64  377   16.014    2.134  3.440
> +Internet-D      128.59.39.48     2 u    1   64  377   12.711    1.992  2.621
> LOCAL(0)        LOCAL(0)        10 l   35   64  377    0.000    0.000 
> 0.001
>
> This server uses a Motorola Oncore GPS Timing receiver as a reference clock. 
> It is selected as the primary synchroniztion source.  Sunburn is a server on 
> my LAN using a WWV receiver as reference clock; it's the middle of the day 
> here and both signal reception and performance are extremely poor. 
> Internet-A, Internet-C and Internet-D are part of the "selection" set and act 
> as an "advisory committee".  Internet-B with the longest round trip delay and 
> a relatively high value of jitter is not being used for anything at this 
> time.
>
>
>
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>

---
Ted Gervais
Coldbrook, Nova Scotia
Canada. (ve1drg)



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