[ntp:questions] bitsy.mit.edu retired?

David L. Mills mills at udel.edu
Sat Aug 16 04:04:23 UTC 2008


Richard,

Yes, the iron russ and dies, but the server name lives forever. The 
rackety.udel.edu server here has outlived the LSI-11 and generations of 
SPARC and Intel processors.

Dave

Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
> David L. Mills wrote:
> 
>> Gushi,
>>
>> Bitsy.mit.edu is alive, but not running NTP for whatever reason.
>>
>> Bitsy.udel.edu was among the first public timetellers in the world, 
>> including clepsydra.decwrl.com and fuzzball dcn1.arpa (128.4.1.1). 
>> They first chimed circa 1984. Of the three, only 128.4.1.1 has public 
>> chime, but now a Pentium called rackety.udel.edu.
>>
>> Dave
>>
>> Gushi wrote:
>>
>>> On Aug 14, 7:29 pm, "Richard B. Gilbert" <rgilber... at comcast.net>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Gushi wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Hey all,
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> I've frequently used the venerable old standby "bitsy.mit.edu" as an
>>>>> NTP server -- it had an easy to remember name, and was more "neutral"
>>>>> than time.windows.com or something similar.  I also recall that it had
>>>>> a fairly open access policy, and over time I had committed the IP
>>>>> address (18.72.0.3) to memory.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> At the current time (no pun intended) I'm unable to get any NTP data
>>>>> from it, and it's not on any of the lists -- has it been retired or
>>>>> shuffled off?  Or am I just crazy?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> -Dan Mahoney
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The fact that it's not on any of the lists suggests that it's not a
>>>> public server!  The fact that you can't get any response to an NTP 
>>>> query
>>>> suggests that it's not running ntpd.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks for the tier-one diagnostic there.
>>>
>>> My hope was more to hear from people who had "gotten a memo" that I
>>> had missed about its retirement, or possibly even hear from an MIT
>>> admin who might have been able to answer.  I had previously (for about
>>> ten years) gotten valid ntp responses from that server.  
> 
> 
> Ten years is about three lifetimes in computer years.  You can keep an 
> old box running for longer but many people don't run them even that long!
> 
> Sooner or later you get to the point where the poor old thing can't run 
> something you want to run; the applications you need, need more RAM than 
> the box will hold or need more CPU cycles than the box can do.  Then 
> it's a paper weight or a door stop!
> 
> Bitsy may have found a place in the Computer History Museum.  Or maybe a 
> place in a dumpster.




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