[ntp:questions] NTP not syncing

unruh unruh at invalid.ca
Sat Nov 2 20:36:31 UTC 2013


On 2013-11-02, antonio.marcheselli at gmail.com <antonio.marcheselli at gmail.com> wrote:
>> How did you "store" on a read only partition. read only means that
>> partition cannot be written to and thus cannot "store" anything.
>
> I have the root privilege. I remounted the RO partition as RW, made my amendments and remounted as RO.
>

Did you check that the file had actually been changed. The physical filesystem
itself might be read only

>> >     server 127.127.1.0
>> 
>> Completely lunatic. You do NOT use the local refclock ever. (And if you
>> know that that statement may have some exceptions, you may know enough
>> to use it, but even then probably not). 
>
> Ok. As I said above, someone from another forum suggested me to add that!
>
>
>> What servers are those? You should NOT be using fixed addresses unless
>> you personally control them. 
>
> This server does not have DNS capabilities and I cannot change it unfortunately. I know that I should not use fixed addresses, but I cannot change it.

No idea what "This server does not have DNs capabilities" means. It does
have access to the net. DNS is simply another network service. Like ntp.

>
> >     restrict 127.0.0.1
>> >     restrict 130.1.1.1 mask 255.255.255.0 nomodify
>> 
>> And those lines are there why?
>
> I believe 130.1.1.1 is a secure device connected to the server. Why the NTP is restricted to that device I'm not sure.
>
> Am I correct in saying that "restrict" prevents other servers from using this server as NTP server? 
>
>> >     tos orphan 4
>> >     driftfile /status/etc/ntp/ntp.drift
>> >     logfile /var/log/ntp.log
>> >     multicastclient
>> >     broadcastdelay 0.008
>> >     enable monitor
>> 
>> > Some of the parameters were on the factory configurations, so I left them. Like the broadcastdelay.
>> > 130.1.1.1 is a secure device which pools the time from the server.
>> 
>> ??? that means what?
>
> Not sure what you're asking. 130.1.1.1 is a device connected to the server which has its own "secure clock" and as such has to sync to something. I understand that it pools the time from the server itself.

So 130.1.1.1 is a client.

>
>> OK. Your system is badly broken. It is impossible for ntp to discipline
>> it. You have to figure out why your hardware is broken before you try to
>> use ntpd.
>
> As mentioned above, it's a Supermicro server board. The same server synced properly over the last 2-3 weeks, then I rebooted it and this is the result.

It might have been that at that time the server was running a bit
slower. 

You could try using the adjtimex (assuming this system is running Linux)
to adjust the tick timing. 


>
> What would you suggest to verify the system clock?
>
>> > This server synced perfectly for the last 2 weeks with the same exact configuration. 
>> 
>> Well, it is broken now. Is it a virtual server? 
>
> No.
>
>> > Could someone please help? I can add a forth server if needed, I also understand that it would be recommended to use the iburst parameter.
>> 
>> Forth is not a language in much use anymore (not that it eer was:-)
>
> sorry! :)
>
>> Nothing you can do can save you except fixing your hardware. 
>
> Well, looks like these servers are experiencing this problem. They're all Supermicro based, is it possible that Supermicro boards have these issues? There may be something I don't know which happens in background, is there a way I can monitor the HW clock to verify the issue?
>

It is not the hardware clock. It is the chip timing or the initial
adjustment calibration for the system clock. 


> Or, is there a way I can setup NTP to be more elastic and step the clock more often without asking too many questions? :)

Nope. 500PPM is a hardwired feature of ntpd. If you are running
linux/bsd then chrony has a wider lattitude of adjustment available to
it than ntpd does. 

>
> Thanks for your help!
>
> Antonio
>
>> 
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>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> >
>> 
>> > Thanks for your help!
>> 
>> >
>> 
>> > Antonio



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